Publications

Comparing Key Provisions: Affordable Care Act, American Health Care Act, and the Graham-Cassidy Proposal

In July 2017, the United States Senate rejected a series of proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). On September 13, 2017, Senators Lindsey Graham and Bill Cassidy introduced a new proposal to repeal and replace the ACA.

The Graham-Cassidy proposal retains some similarities to the American Health Care Act, which passed the U.S. House of Representatives in May 2017, but includes some notable differences. The following table compares key provisions of the Affordable Care Act, American Health Care Act, and the Graham-Cassidy proposal.

The Senate has until September 30, 2017 to pass a repeal and replace package under the Fiscal Year 2017 budget reconciliation process, which requires a simple majority for passage. After the end of FY 2017, any repeal and replace legislation would most likely require 60 votes for passage.[footnote]It is possible that budget reconciliation, requiring a simple majority for passage, could be used for repeal and replace legislation in FY 2018 if it is not used for other issues.

On Sept. 25, the U.S. Congressional Budget Office (CBO) issued a preliminary report on a version of the Graham-Cassidy bill summarized in this brief. The CBO concluded that the bill would save at least $133 billion. However, it would result in millions of people losing health insurance. Additional, detailed analyses may be forthcoming.

Read more in Comparing Key Provisions: Affordable Care Act, American Health Care Act, and the Graham-Cassidy Bill.

Comparing Key Provisions: Affordable Care Act, American Health Care Act, and Better Care Reconciliation Act

Editor’s Note: CHRT revised the following table (originally published June 27, 2017) to reflect both the U.S. Senate’s July 13 revision of its Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) and the Congressional Budget Office’s score of the revised BCRA.  

On June 22, 2017, Senate Republicans released a discussion draft of the Better Care Reconciliation Act, their proposal to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The Senate draft retains a similar overall structure as the American Health Care Act, which passed the U.S. House of Representatives in May 2017, but includes some notable differences. The following table compares key provisions of the Affordable Care Act, American Health Care Act, and Better Care Reconciliation Act. This document reflects the revised Better Care Reconciliation Act as of July 13, 2017. CHRT will update this table if the Senate votes to approve the motion to proceed.

American Health Care Act: Key Provisions and Implications, June 2017 Update

In March 2017, House Republicans unveiled the American Health Care Act (AHCA), their proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). On May 4, the U.S. House of Representatives passed AHCA by a vote of 217-213. On May 24, the U.S. Congressional Budget Office projected that under the House-passed version of AHCA, 14 million more Americans would be uninsured in 2018 than under current law, with the number of additional uninsured rising to 23 million by 2026. In addition, CBO estimated that average individual market premiums would increase by 20% in 2018 compared to under current law, while average premiums after 2020 could decrease depending on states’ decisions to apply for several waivers proposed in AHCA.1 The following summarizes key AHCA provisions and who is primarily affected.

American Health Care Act: Key Provisions and Implications in Michigan

In March 2017, House Republicans unveiled the American Health Care Act (AHCA), their proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). On March 13, the U.S. Congressional Budget Office projected that under the AHCA, 14 million Americans would lose their health insurance in 2018, with the number of uninsured rising to 24 million by 2026. The following summarizes key AHCA provisions and who in Michigan is primarily affected.

For more details, see CHRT’s companion piece, “American Health Care Act: Michigan Impacts.”

 

American Health Care Act: Michigan Impacts

According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the American Health Care Act would have differential impacts on individuals depending on factors such as age, income, geographic location, plan choice, and overall health. In general, the CBO concluded that people who are older, sicker, or receive their coverage through Medicaid will likely see higher costs or lower levels of benefits, while people who are higher income, younger, and healthier are likely to face lower costs or tax savings.

For more details, see CHRT’s companion piece, “American Health Care Act: Key Provisions and Michigan Implications.”

 

 

Select Affordable Care Act replacement plans and implications

health insurance marketplace

Read Full Brief Here

No single strategy to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has yet emerged. However, there are several ideas that seem to have considerable support among those in health care leadership roles in President Trump’s Administration and Congress.

This brief, Select Affordable Care Act Replacement Plans and Implications, summarizes the key features of the most developed full repeal and replacement plans offered to date.

You can also see CHRT’s companion piece, ACA Repeal and Replacement: Proposals and Action, for a one-page summary of the plans and tentative process.