Publications

Comparing Recent Health Care Proposals: From building on the ACA to Medicare for All

Democratic lawmakers in Congress have made a variety of proposals to strengthen or reform the United States health care system. These proposals range from building upon the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to fully transitioning the U.S. to a single-payer system.

This fact sheet categorizes and compares the major provisions of these proposals, including possible implications for consumers, health care providers, and federal and state governments.

Read Comparing recent health care proposals: From building on the ACA to Medicare for All.

Projected impacts of Medicaid work requirements: An overview of current state proposals

As of January 2019, 14 states have submitted proposals to the federal government requesting permission to establish work requirements in their Medicaid programs. To date, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has approved Medicaid work requirements for seven states, and two states (Arkansas and Indiana) have begun implementing these requirements for Medicaid beneficiaries.

In June 2018, Michigan enacted work requirements for many enrollees in the Healthy Michigan Plan (HMP), Michigan’s expanded Medicaid program for low-income adults.

Beginning in January 2020, HMP enrollees under age 63 will be required to report 80 hours of work per month or obtain an exemption (see CHRT’s previous fact sheet, Proposed Medicaid Work Requirements in Michigan).

The Michigan House Fiscal Agency initially estimated that approximately 80 percent of enrollees would be subject to the requirements, while 20 percent would qualify for an exemption.  More recently, an independent analysis by Manatt Health projected that 39 percent of HMP enrollees would be automatically exempt (based on age, pregnancy, medically frail, or incarceration status; or because they are already meeting SNAP/TANF work requirements), while 61 percent would be required to report work hours or obtain an exemption. This analysis estimated that 9 to 27 percent of all HMP enrollees could lose coverage over a one-year period.

Read Projected Impacts of Medicaid Work Requirements in Michigan.

 

Michigan at a crossroads: CHRT highlights key health policy issues for the incoming gubernatorial administration

The Michigan government has jurisdiction over a wide array of health policy issues. From the regulation of insurance products, to oversight of the state’s Medicaid program, to investing in local public health efforts, Michigan policymakers craft policies and budgets that impact the health of millions of Michiganders.

This brief provides an overview of four key and timely health policy topics:

  • Medicaid and the Healthy Michigan Plan;
  • the individual health insurance market and the federal Health Insurance Marketplace;
  • the opioid epidemic; and
  • the integration of services to address the social determinants of health.

It also explores some of the forces influencing our state’s health and discusses policy approaches to today’s health and health care issues.

Read the full brief.

 

Proposed work requirements for Medicaid in Michigan: June 7, 2018

At the start of 2018, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced a major shift in federal policy that would allow states to request permission to establish, and test the impact of, work and community engagement requirements for able-bodied adults receiving Medicaid health insurance coverage. In the last five months, work requirement proposals have been approved in four states; formal applications have been submitted by seven more, and a number of others are preparing proposals.

Read Full Brief Here

In April, the Michigan State Senate took the first step toward establishing work requirements by passing Senate Bill 897. The Michigan House of Representatives passed an updated version of the bill on June 6. And on the morning of June 7, the Michigan Senate approved the revisions and sent the bill to the Governor’s office for signature.

Proposed work requirements for Medicaid in Michigan: April 20, 2018

At the start of 2018, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced a major shift in federal policy that would allow states to request permission to establish, and test the impact of, work and community engagement requirements for able-bodied adults receiving Medicaid health insurance coverage. In the last three months, work requirement proposals have been approved in three states; formal applications have been submitted by seven more; and a number of others are preparing proposals.

Read Full Brief Here

In early March, Michigan state senators took the first step toward preparing a work requirement proposal of their own by introducing Senate Bill 897. The bill passed the Michigan State Senate on April 19. In this fact sheet, we compare the characteristics and projected impact of Michigan’s Medicaid work requirement proposal against the characteristics and projected impact of approved work requirement proposals in Kentucky, Indiana, and Arkansas.

Issue Brief: Bipartisan Budget Act adds $3B for substance abuse, mental health, more

The Bipartisan Budget Act was signed into law on February 9, 2018. While the main purpose of the legislation is to temporarily fund the federal government through March 23, 2018, it also includes an agreement to raise the caps on domestic and military spending for the next two years.

The legislation includes many health care policies, as well. The major policies are described in Health Care Policies in the Bipartisan Budget Act (H.R. 1892).